4 marketing essentials from Google, Facebook and LinkedIn

Today marks the start of our 2014 Digital Financial Services Summit and as a content marketer it’s a personal favorite from our portfolio.

This morning kicked off with Google, LinkedIn and Facebook all talking about their latest developments and it was interesting stuff. It genuinely makes me excited to be working in this field.

There seemed to be some real change in the room from even just 12 months ago. People are really starting to ‘get it’ when it comes to smart, customer centric marketing models but a few key things really stood out.

The linear funnel is dead.

Ok, maybe that’s slightly dramatic but we can’t just move people down a linear path any more. Just like digital in its essence, we’re currently going through exponential growth in the way we service and market to customers. Connecting on a ‘flight path’ now seems more accurate than taking through a funnel.

For example, statistics demonstrate that people on average have taken themselves through 60 per cent of the overall buying cycle by the time they engage with a brand. Using a flight path approach will allow companies to connect across more or those touch points rather than assuming they can be pushed through a linear funnel. It also offers the best chance of being in mind before 60 per cent of the decision has been made.

It’s perhaps these sorts of statistics that drove Barclays Bank in the UK move 25 per cent of their service desks straight into one of the leading supermarkets, Asda.

Content is not.

Content marketing is the leading marketing tactic. It’s been around for years, probably around 150 but in 2014 the barrier is low and the ROI is high.

In Australia, Facebook users who log on everyday (85 per cent of overall users) log on 14 times. There’s a constant hunger for keeping updated and consuming knowledge.

Even on LinkedIn, well known as being a place of job opportunities – Content is currently viewed 7 times more than jobs posts on the platform.

So what’s going to make good content going forward? It’s still the same principle – helping someone and offering value. To tie in with the omni style flight path, and 50 per cent of traffic now through mobile, we’re going to see the rise of Big Rocks. In other words, those big pieces you can slice and dice 5-10 other ways. This generally starts with an eBook, but then splits into articles, videos, webinars, infographics, podcasts etc.

We’ve still got emotions

Many a marketing team is trying to get a grasp on data, targeting, segmenting and creating various different buyer personas. However, some of the most successful marketing campaigns of the year have played more on our emotive sides, a reminder to never forget the powerful impacts a heartfelt campaign can have.

The latest example is the #TDThanksyou from Canadian Bank TD. And yes, I challenge you to watch it without shedding a tear – I failed (6 times). The video with the tagline ‘Sometimes you just want to say thank you’ has had over 10 million views and doesn’t play on any of the features the bank can offer with smart analytics or intelligent services. Nope it focuses on positive awareness and brand reputation, but I tell you what – I’d bank with them!

Mobile mobile mobile

I wish I’d started a kitty for $1 every time the word mobile was mentioned. Mobile has very much become our primary screen and we need to make sure every single landing page is optimized for that.

In any customer centric model, to be with the customer from the start of the journey, there absolutely has to be a massive focus on mobile. It’s about ‘information that moves with you’ – get that wrong and you’ve lost that customer forever.

Drawing on finance as an example, search results show that ‘home loan’ as a term was very much a Monday-Friday search. It completely dropped off at the weekend. However, we’re now seeing a consistent level of search results 7 days a week – this is causing the home lending companies to move into real estate listings to be there on the day as the person is looking at a house – being a mobile tap away from seeing if the buyer will be accepted for funds as the notion pops into their head.

Google are working on a next generation mobile concept for our everyday lives with phones connecting into the internet of things. ‘Project Tango’ (and you can find more here https://www.google.com/atap/projecttango/#project) uses visual cues to map out interactions. The goal of Project Tango is’ to give mobile devices a human-scale understanding of space and motion.’

Only time will tell the next big trends to make an impact, but no matter what tech occurs, it’s never been more important to start planning for being agile as a business. There are things that aren’t in the market yet, but the only way you can take advantage is to set a flexible working model now.

Last note – Did you know that if you’d have bought 100 bit coins in 2010, they’d be worth 761,000 now!?

Join the conversation @digifinance #digifinance

Low cost marketing innovation – 4 essentials to success

It’s tough to be a marketer. It’s hard to allocate cash for innovation, but at the same time rapid consumer behaviour changes and increased competition make it a bit tricky to stand out.

All is not lost. We can once again get our creative juices flowing without breaking the bank (sorry…). I recently took a look at the world of Financial Services and it’s safe to say a few obstacles need to be overcome; the allure of the non-banks and a heck of a lot of expectation from the customer.

With that in mind I recently caught up with Simon Clarke, Head of Online Banking Suncorp.

Simon and the team have a clear focus: “We’re delivering our new core banking capability. It is a major strategic initiative for us and will enable a new generation of customer experience through our simpler and more agile platform.”

“At more of a group level, we are constantly looking at ways we can improve the customer experience across our key areas of banking, life and insurance. We want to ensure that customers have a consistent experience no matter what product they have and touch point they engage us from.”

The team have a smaller budget than the major banks, encouraging (sometimes forcing) Suncorp to think outside the box to build and optimise customer experience. This approach can often far outweigh consultation and reading through insight all day.

So how exactly are they doing this? Here’s Simon’s recipe to success:

Sweat the small stuff

“Post GFC, innovation has been always associated with research and development. But in more recent times, people and customers have come to realise that innovation isn’t always about the newest technology or gadget. It’s often just tapping away to remove a step or part of a process.

“We often find in banking that we build, design, rebuild and redesign technologies very quickly due to tech improvements and resilience. But we often neglect to review the process which the technology facilitates. That often leads to a slick looking application underpinned by a very long, frustrating seven-step process to do something that should only take two.

“We have a goal in which we constantly go through customer journey maps and ask: ‘Does that need to be there? Is it just because it’s always been there?’ As we optimise our websites, online banking platforms and mobile channels, we have the opportunity to challenge and improve the process. We also blend with user experience design so every word, click or tap culminates in a simple, easy to use engagement.”

What to do today: Innovate incrementally. Start with a small pain point with your product, system or process. Pull it apart and put it back together 2% at a time. Overtime, these 2% add to 20% very quickly and culminates in achieving high customer satisfaction at low cost and risk.

Mix it up

“We often find it amusing the costs that come out of delivering innovative technology or simply keeping up with customer demand. All of our banking platforms are designed and built in-house.

“This allows for very tight ‘product teams’ to form with a mix of business and IT people to take a challenge, sketch it, design it, user-test it, build it, secure it and get it out the door within a few days. We have feedback forms that are monitored and answered by product owners so every idea, complaint or comment goes straight to the person who can make a decision and execute on that idea or fix that problem.”

What to do today: Speak constantly to your team to understand roadblocks and attack them one by one to form a lean, effective team. Take the time to also listen to your customers. They should influence and be a part of your strategy and execution, not just an end user.

Look past the fancy reports

“From a design and UX perspective, again we use the same tools that a small business might to perform UI online tests, surveys and lab tests using basic video conference equipment.

“Some of these tools can cost $150 to run and the feedback and insight we get is amazing compared to a $10,000 report. We love using these ‘guerrilla tactics’. From an execution side, it allows us to try a lot of new things and if some don’t hit the mark, there isn’t a swollen budget sitting at the other end.”

What to do today: If you need insight, there’s plenty of it out there for free. Form an idea, build it out with creative and knowledgably colleagues and put it to the test. Learn fast and do it cheap. If the idea doesn’t hit the mark, gather your learnings and put it towards your next opportunity.

Persist

“Having a ‘fail fast and learn’ culture can be difficult to achieve and persist. But with the right attitude, enthusiasm and decision-making capability, we can strive to build the easiest-to-use websites and online banking platforms and see the effects through direct feedback.

“I think the biggest challenge is building the right culture and acknowledging that innovation doesn’t need to be cutting edge development. Simple touches each day accumulate to building an innovative model that customers can appreciate each time they engage us.”

What to do today: Build a safe working environment that allows your staff to thrive in generating and testing ideas. Isolate risk adversity so that it is managed but not impacting your ability to innovate and drive user experience.

Join Simon at Digital Financial Services 2014, he’ll be delivering the Case Study ‘Banking Channels at Speed through Lean Innovation’.  Visit www.digitalfinancialservices.com.au or tweet @digifinance

Too many insurers focusing on process, not experience

There’s a bit of an issue with in the claims industry if this is the case, according to KPMG’s 2013 General Insurance Industry Survey, only 33% of insurers feel their distribution network generates a consistent positive customer experience across all channels. Perhaps even more worryingly, results show 72% of insurers still do not feel their firm’s digital strategy adequately supports building trust with suppliers.

The claims experience is pretty unique; perhaps one of the most emotional many people will go through. When you make a claim, many customers are experiencing a time of trauma. It can be quite difficult to match service levels, procedures and experience. One way to adapt to this is by building trust and rapport between claims representatives and the customer. There are a few different areas that need to be addressed. I recently turned to one of Australia’s leading insurance providers, Allianz, to get some insight.

Engagement and culture

Allianz is continuing to drive employee engagement as a key focus. Allianz was named as the Large General Insurance Company of the Year for the last three years running. Commenting on the most recent award, Niran Peiris, Managing Director said “Allianz’s focus is on delivering a tailored, flexible and competitive service. When it comes to our customers, our philosophy is to deliver a service that builds loyalty, particularly when it comes to delivering on our promise to help them in the event of a claim.”

In addition, the Life Claims area of the business also recently won the 2013 ‘Product of the Year’ at the Australian Banking and Finance’s 2013 Insurance Awards. Praise included ‘The Allianz Life claims experience, which offers customers dedicated specialist Life claims officers ensuring exceptional service.’

Linda Broady, Head of Customer Focus explains the on-going journey across the organisation:

“Developing a strong customer culture and high levels of employee engagement requires sustained focus and attention over the long haul. You can never take your eye off the ball. Creating a truly customer focussed culture is something that only comes from relentless and long term effort and attention, from the top down, and across every part of the organisation. We approach this in a very deliberate way through an ongoing cycle of measurement, action planning, communication, execution and line management accountability.

“Aligned with our focus on building a service culture, creating an engaged workforce is equally important if we are to maintain consistent and exceptional service levels. In addition to driving this via line management accountability, we have Regional Leadership Teams in every geographical location responsible for developing and executing engagement action plans aimed at addressing local opportunities. As a result, our engagement levels continually improve and are well above the Australian norm.”

Recognition is another important lever in creating an engaged workforce and driving service culture. We have local and enterprise recognition programs that recognise and reward customer focussed behaviour, by both internally and externally focussed employees.

“One of our key leadership values is ‘Building mutual trust and feedback’. As part of this we conduct an annual Internal NPS program aimed at generating constructive dialogue and measuring internal service levels. A healthy customer focussed organisation must have a strong service ethic at all levels and across all functions. Employees and managers delivering service to external customers rely on receiving excellent service themselves to be effective.

“In insurance, you get limited opportunities to get it right with the customer, as interactions are typically irregular. Therefore, it’s vitally important we leverage those opportunities when we get them. Having employees who are able to genuinely engage with customers is an essential ingredient in the creation of loyalty and trust. The link between engaged employees, willingness to apply more discretionary effort, and improved service levels is well established, and is central to our beliefs at Allianz.

“It’s widely understood that a claim experience can be a moment of truth for a customer. The circumstances surrounding a claim can often be stressful and associated with heightened emotions. As such, the customer’s experience has the potential to be one of delight or dissatisfaction.

“Employees managing claims need a combination of technical skill and emotional intelligence. Targeting people with a strong service ethic has been a key ingredient in our hiring practices for a number of years, not only within Claims but across the whole organisation. The ability to engage with and have genuine conversations with our customers at every touchpoint and interaction is essential in creating strong relationships.

“The most important time of all is during a claim. Claims specialists need to have a finely tuned antenna to respond with the appropriate amount of empathy and apply good judgement and common sense. For example, a customer calling from a motor accident scene may not be in the right frame of mind to respond to questions that enable us to complete claim lodgement. There are more important issues at stake – for example, is the customer and their passengers OK? Would they simply like reassurance that they can get their car towed away without getting our approval? And, yes, that it’s fine to call back or lodge the claim online or via our Claims app later.”

Nowhere was the importance of having the right people to manage claims more clearly demonstrated than in the case of last year’s NSW Bushfires, where over 200 properties were devastated, and the lives of those impacted were irrevocably changed.

Allianz has an experienced, specially trained team and a robust Event Response Plan that is mobilised into action when these type of catastrophic events occur, including a Mobile Office to ensure we can base our operations wherever they are needed.

However it’s the people that make the difference in times like these. One of our employees involved in working with customers who had been impacted by the NSW Bushfires said, “I noticed [I could] speak with a customer one day and they [hadn’t] retained much of the conversation a few days later. They [were] dealing with the fact that they will need to rebuild their homes and lives and for those doing repairs, they feel guilty for still having a house when others have nothing left. … Some had lost their home, special trinkets, family heirlooms and even pets. All they were left with were memories of their lives. I realised I would have a direct impact on their lives and this was a very powerful and emotional thought for me personally – I formed a connection with all the customers I spoke with”

Build supportive systems

Allianz operates a complex business model, servicing B2B (brokers, motor dealers, mortgage brokers and financial institutions), B2C (direct business) and B2B2C (end customer of intermediaries).

This presents challenges in managing claims, acting on behalf of our partners as well as ourselves.

When a claim is lodged, it is allocated to a Claims Specialist, who is responsible for the smooth and efficient management of the claim. Allianz ensures that other members of the team can assist with enquiries should the customer or a third party (such as repairer or assessor) call when they are unavailable. Linda explains how consistency is ensured:

“We have clear service delivery and behavioural standards and metrics to ensure quality and consistency in execution.

“At the end of the day, the most efficient process is one that suits the customer. If your people practices, systems and processes don’t align with delivering an experience that works for the customer then, not only does it drive a poor experience, it creates inefficiencies and reduces productivity.

One of the areas we’re focusing on right now is end-to-end experience design to ensure we are delivering experiences that fit customer needs and expectations. This starts with understanding the service attributes that define satisfaction at specific touchpoints. Along with redesign, building metrics and methodologies to measure experience from the customer’s perspective and link them to employee accountabilities, is essential to a healthy customer experience ecosystem.

Join Linda Broady during Claims Experience Management 2014 where she will be delivering the Case Study: Embedding a Culture of High Performance: Using Voice of Customer to Reduce Customer Effort and Optimise Service Quality and Consistency.

Getting true value from outsourcing: the recipe for success

I first bumped into Jane Stafford, Executive Manager for Banking Process & Optimisation at Suncorp Banking during our Process Excellence event last year,  then again during Shared Services and Outsourcing Week. Jane certainly knows a thing or two about outsourcing – she’s been in the banking and finance industry for more than 20 years, spending years managing the optimal blend of insourcing and outsourcing strategies and implementation for business processes.

Jane’s current role is to manage Process Ownership for Suncorp Bank, monitoring, measuring and delivering business improvement strategies with a focus on process simplification, cost reduction and improved customer experience.  I recently caught up with Jane ahead of here workshop at SSOW 2014 to delve into the key ingredients for achieving an optimal blend – helping other organisations to maximise the true value of outsourcing.  Jane shared her insights on how the landscape has shifted, paving a new way for vendor relationships. Take a read below:

I’m absolutely seeing a need for outsourced providers to continue to be relevant by looking at providing services that sit outside of data entry. Automation is really kicking off in in our industry. We’re seeing far more centralisation of corporate functions (generally the higher value activities like analytics). That’s going have a flow-on effect into knowledge process outsourcing.

We’re seeing the impact of increased regulation occurring. That puts a squeeze on our margins and puts the spotlight on process innovation. The knock on effect to providers is they need to be able to innovate with end to end outsourcing and continue to drive down the cost that sits within that process through lean methodology or something similar.

A few years ago there was a lot of low hanging fruit for outsource providers, if they could do the data entry, they had business. However, client needs are changing as a consequence of a number of different factors that puts pressure on them to go up the value curve in terms of what they can offer from the service point of view.

There are a few fundamentals when looking to cement outsourcing and drive relationships that open up new levels of value:

Keep the ingredients fresh

The secret is building capability in-house to manage optimal blends. Optimal blends means that you are constantly looking at your landscape, making decisions around what is appropriate to outsource, automate and keep in-house.

It’s not as simple as locking in on those three things; it’s constantly evolving depending on what’s happening within your business, what’s happening within the environment and what’s happening in your innovation stakes. We have found most success in just having that management capability pool.

We’ve set up that infrastructure to manage an optimal blend for both onshore and offshore. My team are constantly monitoring dashboards to work out what’s on the horizon in terms of automation onshore or offshore. That involves rolling things back from time to time, and having a framework based on strategy rather than just reacting to what we had done previously.

Set the right temperature

Look at all the decisions that will need to happen to support the way you’ve decided to go. It starts by establishing your core competencies – all the decisions are based around that and people will be challenged if there’s no understanding of what they are.

Executive sponsorship is crucial. There needs to be an appetite to manage the people and cultural components, because every decision you make around in-house, automation or outsourcing has knock on effects that need to be managed throughout that change period. You won’t get your benefit if that isn’t addressed very early on.

One of the key things we learnt five or six years ago is that it’s okay to have a strategy that’s learnt during outsourcing, but if the business is not ready in its own maturity and its own journey, where you haven’t intervened enough to support a new culture, that culture will eat your strategy anyway.

Clean up as you go

Be clear on what your drivers are if you’re choosing to outsource. For us, it was about cost efficiency, labour arbitrage and accessing scale from the outset. But the more and more I get into it, the less important those factors are to me personally, the more I’m actually looking to have providers perform innovation, lean  and refine our processes to remove waste from them. If you don’t have that, your processes end up being old and full of waste.

There’s never a truer analogy of garbage in, garbage out, than when you’re doing an outsource transition…

Set the timer, watch it rise

There are some key areas where you can unlock huge value in the vendor–client relationship: 

  • Move away from master-servant relationships: We’ve tried to co-locate and second people from the outsourced organisation into our organisation, coming to an arrangement with our provider where we actually have contracted in someone from India to be in my team for 12 months. They are actively working in Australia, onshore, understanding the business end-to-end. It takes trust to open your books completely, but the sharing of information and depth of understanding about what we can achieve for our customers is far deeper.
  • At an operational level: Position your outsource provider as an extension of your current team, just sat in another location. Include them in your reward and recognition programme – our outsourcers tend to really enjoy that. It’s still a work in progress for us, but I think it’s the next big thing, to challenge both organisations to position themselves around the commercial structure. That’s where you’re really putting everything on the line.
  • Think beyond the service levels: Our commercials are still structured around SLAs, turnaround times and individual processes. That inhibits everybody from being free of worrying about whether or not a penalty is going to apply. The future is about contracting to end outcomes and saying, “You know what? We don’t care if it’s 24 hours or if it’s 48 hours, this is the outcome we are looking for”. The onus is on both sides, it takes trust and the other party to be willing to not take advantage of that trust too.

4 key steps to transform from claims process to claims experience

As the phrase ‘Customer-centricity’ shows no signs of slowing down, I recently caught up with Richard Poole, Head of AustralianSuper account at TAL Life to see what this means for the Claims industry. He explained:

“We’ve taken on a very customer-centric view across our entire business. The customer is at the forefront of everything we do; our processes, our policies and our products and most importantly in all of the personal interactions with our customers, or our service.”

The 4 key streams to focus on:

  1. Build relationships with your customers

Knowing our clients well means we can understand what products they actually want and need. We then also have a better understanding of how can we satisfy that need while still being efficient and cost effective. It’s about looking for the win-win.

  • Building a relationship is relatively straightforward when dealing with our direct customers, because we have a connection with them from day one. From the first contact we establish that relationship directly, and it stays all the way through the life of that customer. Hopefully, for their sake it won’t result in a claim, but if it does, they’ve got a consistent experience with us all the way through.
  • With Retail customers (adviser-driven), the relationship is generally owned by a financial adviser. So we may not get involved with these customers until the time when a claim needs to be made. Our role here is to manage the process as quickly and simply as possible, supporting the client’s relationship with the advisor.
  • It can be harder to build a relationship with our Group customers, because their insurance comes packaged with their superannuation. Similarly to Retail customers, our role generally comes into play when they need to make a claim on their policy. This is when we have the opportunity to build a relationship, by providing support through a difficult time.

Over the last 12 months, we’ve been working on those relationships to identify how we streamline that process and establish strong direct links to the customer.

Ideally, the customer will be able to make one phone call, or submit a claim through one channel, preferably with us, while we can keep all other interested parties informed in real-time.

  1. Clearer communications

The key issue around product is always going to come from the terms and conditions, and the wording of those products.

We’ve come a long way in the last few years to have more plain English in our products, with the days of fine print and ambiguous wording well gone. The key is to make it as easy as possible for the customer to understand exactly what they’re buying, and to help them understand under what circumstances they can make a claim on that policy. It’s also our responsibility to make sure the policy has very clear entry and eligibility rules, to ensure the validity of a claim is unambiguous for claims assessors.

Plain language cuts down on confusion and miscommunication between the customer and ourselves. Everybody knows exactly what’s expected of them, and there shouldn’t be any surprises.

  1. Provide a seamless experience

Wherever possible, our processes are agnostic to the channel. We try to build in as much automation into those processes as we can while retaining the flexibility to ensure we’re managing exceptions and preserving the customer experience.

Standardise as much as you can, keep your claims process system updated and keep refining it. We’re currently on Year One of a three-year project to build our new claims system into the business. It’s bringing in another level of automation, including being able to segment claims into the appropriate areas of complexity.

  1. Add value

The next step in modern claims processing is to begin to add value to the customer to assist their return to wellness. The way we’re doing that now is by really focusing on the customer and their needs very early on. It’s that move from reactive to proactive, and being there right from the start of the journey.

It’s time to think outside the box for funding.

Monash Health are currently in the process of building new and improved facilities at Dandenong Hospital to ensure continued access to the highest quality of care for the community.

The work will redevelop a number of community and ambulatory care services which are provided in disparate locations and to bring them into one central precinct in central Dandenong.

As with many other projects one of the key challenges has been funding. With funding increasingly becoming a barrier to development, I had a chat with the Capital Planning Manager at Monash Health; Anna Morgan to get an insight on the innovative approaches used to get funding.

Five years ago Monash worked with the Department of Health to develop business cases for funding. However, they were unsuccessful in bids for funding from State and Federal Government. The conditions of the buildings housing the health services that were being provided were becoming critical, another set of business cases and another source of funding solution had to be found.

The solution came from internal funding; Monash acquired long term leasehold of a property and then arranged for the landlord to fit out the building in accordance with their design, over the ten year lease period, Monash will pay back the landlord for those fit out works.

The project is currently well into design, closing off schematic design and into design and documentation with the aim of going out to tender by the end of July, and engaging a key contractor in August.

Anna explained how there’s a need for a new form of thinking in Victoria: “ We are having to get a bit smarter with our funding and make it stretch a lot further, we’re not getting the same sort of funding. We need to think outside the box if we want to keep resourcing our facilities, so not just looking to government for funding. Look to inside your organisation, sponsorship and other support methods, it’s a key way to get funding to renew services and renew facilities. There are some health services in Victoria that are starting to do that, but many that still aren’t looking beyond the main stream.”

We also have to be a lot smarter in the way we’re using the budgets, it’s coming through to a much smaller level. In the past we might have got two or three million for a project, now we’re expected to achieve a small refurb with a million dollars instead. It’s a huge challenge to prioritise the key aspects of a development rather than doing the full project”.

Interested in hearing more expert insights on how to tackle some of Australia’s biggest health challenges, check out http://www.austhealthweek.com.au

Is the tide about to turn for big banks?

The loan process is a complicated one; we’re not talking about snap decisions but potentially life changing ones for the customer.

In the past this is just one factor that has enabled the big banks to gain a huge chunk of the lending pie.

But with a wave of new and innovative companies entering the market, how can non-banks take advantage of the huge opportunities becoming available and where are the more established lenders falling behind?

Heidi Armstrong is a name that many will find familiar. Heidi is the CEO of online lender, State Custodians; where she also runs the successful blog ‘Ask Heidi’. It’s been a pretty good year for the company who proudly position themselves as Australia’s Non-Bank, a label Heidi firmly believes gives them the leading edge. State Custodians has not only won Money Magazine’s Non-Bank of the Year for the last three consecutive years but has also taken out the Best Non-Bank Lender and Best Online Operator at the 2013 Australian Lending Awards.

In an age where knowing the customer and earning trust trust can potentially win business, I sought insight from Heidi on how this relatively small business has the potential to take on the big four:

“State Custodians was one of the first mortgage lenders to fully embrace the web to attract new business. We understand what web visitors want – so as well as driving traffic we know how to convert website visitors into borrowers.”

Positioning
There was a time when a brand name carried the primary weighting for a customer evaluating their lending options. However, online growth has changed many of the factors customers prioritise so ‘non-banks’ have really been able to grow and compete:

“When you go up against the big banks, you have to position the company differently. Our proposition is to be the friendly authority. It goes right to the heart of what the non-bank service proposition stands for and resonates with customers looking outside banks for options.”

“We certainly don’t have the marketing dollars of banks so we have to get smarter in how we spend our dollars. A large part of our marketing involves educating the audience around the value of the non-bank proposition, what we do and how we work. We’re consistent and relevant and that’s how we build trust.

“It’s not just telling people you’re the best or safest. It’s demonstrating it in various ways. Our biggest source of new business is referrals from existing clients. This has the added benefit that those clients then do the trust positioning on our behalf.

Targeting
There are two main audiences within the lending product portfolio; new customers and providing additional options and value to existing customers. Gone are the days when you can use one message for both:

Heidi explained an area where segmenting messages delivers impressive engagement results:  “For our electronic mail (EDM’s) to the lead database we’ll use State Custodians branding and deliver relevant and high value content that goes beyond pushing our own products. Typically our open rate for these is 29% with a 19% click through rate. However it is the Ask Heidi brand that we use for EDM’s to existing clients. Open rates are 41% and click through rates are over 18%. These EDM’s have been far more successful once we introduced the Ask Heidi personality into the mix.

“In the back office we collate customer information into a single database so everyone has the same picture of a customer. It allows us to provide a consistent and fluid service by monitoring and engaging with clients who provide feedback. We do this through social media including independent forums such as product review.  Responses to any negative client feedback are treated with very high importance internally and are managed at a senior level. This ensures we engage with the client genuinely but also take on-board necessary improvements and changes.”If you are prepared to listen, the client will tell you a lot about your business. They can highlight inefficiencies or where there are potential difficulties. If you are engaging well with your customers they are happy to give you honest and constructive feedback. We send an email survey to clients on settlement and we get around a 75% open rate and a 54% click through completion rate. We have real genuine engagement with our borrowers, and it’s giving us the edge.”

Hear more from Heidi during Loan Origination 2014 where she will be delivering the presentation Channel innovation: leveraging technology to provide an exceptional online experience. Heidi will also be joining an expert panel to discuss what key factors drive customer acquisition and retention in today’s “new normal?

 Visit www.loanorigination.com.au