14 Things you didn’t know about Cloudera

It’s fair that we can’t really start this without a little introduction to Cloudera. They were really bumped up our radar this year after topping $100 million in revenue in 2015.

Founded in 2008, Cloudera was the first, and is currently, the leading provider and supporter of Apache Hadoop for the enterprise. Cloudera also offers software for business critical data challenges including storage, access, management, analysis, security, and search.

  • Cloudera added 264 new software subscription customers in FY 2015 (which ended in January 2015) for a total customer count of 535.
  • Cloudera has over 1,400 partners, around 800 are systems integrators/professional services firms.
  • The company plans to shift is messaging away from the underlying technology and towards business use cases/outcomes. It is focusing its go-to-market efforts on two specific vertical industries – financial services and telecommunications – and on large enterprises with $1 billion-plus in annual revenue.
  • Once of the co-founders Mike Olsen is a pretty interesting fella. In a recent interview he revealed his dad has one of the very first Apple Computers “When I was growing up, my stepdad bought an Apple II computer. Serial number 125 – built by the Steves in a garage. That’s how I learned to computer program around 1976- ­77.”
  • Mike was also a Mexican chef who dropped out of Berkley – He was doing a PhD when he realised he didn’t like research half as much as he liked his team so left to join Illustra. (The Mexican Chef part came during some travels on a first break from Berkley).
  • It all started with Hadoop – Facebooks, Jeff Hammerbacher, Yahoo’s Amr Awadallah, and Google’s Christoph Bisciglia from Google all joined Mike in their excitement around Hadoop – and Cloudera was formed.
  • Hadoop is a technology invented by Google in the early 2000s. It was initially created to help sell more advertisements but quickly became transportable to other industries as a data management solution.
  • Hadoop refers to an open source file distribution system and job scheduler that distributes data analysis jobs over infinitely large numbers of small servers to process data-intensive queries at high speed. Hadoop is available free under the Apache open source license, but has also found its way into the enterprise via paid, supported distributions.
  • Cloudera announced it was launching in Australia in 2013, choosing Australia as the centre of Cloudera’s APAC efforts because the “language is easy, and the business culture, legal and financial infrastructure is the right fit”.
  • The market for big data technology is growing rapidly. In 2014, Cloudera closed a $US900 million funding round, $US740 million of it from Intel which now has an 18 per cent stake. The money was assigned to help Cloudera build its share in a highly contested and rapidly expanding market.
  • The company’s regional operations are run by Sydney-based Chris Poulos, vice president for Asia Pacific and Japan who said he already had a number of people in sales, engineering and support in Australia. He has a positive take on the Australian market: “Australia seems to be the leader in adoption of the big data, especially by large corporations. They have already done their skunkworks projects and are now moving to the next level.
  • In 2014 Cloudera, now the leader in enterprise analytic data management powered by Apache Hadoop, named to Deloitte’s Technology Fast 500™, a ranking of the 500 fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications, life sciences and clean technology companies in North America. Cloudera was ranked 36th on the list with over 4,439% growth over the past five years.
  • Cloudera expanded its partner program, Cloudera Connect, by 78% during last year, announcing partnerships with Accenture, Capgemini, Dell, EMC Isilon, Informatica, Intel, Microsoft, MongoDB, NEC, Red Hat, SAP, Teradata, and others to accelerate the deployment of Hadoop. The Cloudera partner ecosystem, the largest in the industry, expanded beyond 1,450 companies.
  • They look for unique traits in their talent. Two key principles stood out – 1) Does this person fit with the rest of the team. No matter how skilled you are, if it’s not a team fit they’re not interested. 2)  Has this person done surprising things? Olsen told the story on his blog of an interview for a sales candidate – “I interviewed a candidate who’d had a long and successful run as a salesman for large enterprise software companies. That’s our profile. We see a lot of those candidates. This person, though, stood out from the crowd easily. After several years of success and great paychecks in sales, he’d quit his job for a couple years, studied and mastered Transcendental Meditation and trekked to Pakistan to climb K2. He succeeded in summiting the mountain and continues to practice TM today. With those experiences, and somewhat short of money, he went back to work selling software – We hired him.

Check out Mike’s full profile here.

Follow stories from the latest tech brands here. 

How to know if you’re the right fit for a fast growth company.

There’s a lot of buzz, myth and speculation around what it’s like to work in a fast growth or start-up company.

I came across a lot of material around culture, but not so much about career experience. So I had a dig around to get some real insight on working for a company that’s growing pretty fast.

The experience.

Without a doubt you’ll learn heaps – A common theme from everyone that’s worked in a start-up, whether they’ve enjoyed it or not, they’ve learnt loads. By loads I’m talking more in two months than the previous five years.

A start-up forces you to adopt new skills and responsibilities to make up for the big challenges that come with building a really successful business.

The pay-off – experience in all areas of the business and much more responsibility – you can find yourself in a powerful position when it comes time to move on.

No longer a small cog in a large machine – everything you do has impact, but this means it’s time to say goodbye to having a safety blanket. Want to contribute to success or even failure? Small companies will help you focus and push yourself – helping you to become a real problem solver and thinking of creative ways to get there.

The pay-off: you’ll often get to see results first-hand and share in the rewards and glory.

Surrounded by bright sparks – Perhaps one of the most often overlooked rewards is the team that you’ve joined. How many people work with passionate and enthusiastic team players every single day? This can spark inspiration on every level, leading to truly innovative ideas that helps the business stand out against competitors in the greater industry.

The pay-off: The opportunity to work alongside an entrepreneur is a big one — they identify a problem and find a new efficient way to solve it – you’d be part of that.

It’s not forever – If you’re looking for a comfy job with routine and regularity then you’re looking in the wrong place. It’s important to think about the day to day nature of the above and think about whether it’s for you. Joining a company that’s growing quickly gives you the opportunity to start learning what it takes to be your own boss.

Joining a start-up gives you the opportunity to start learning what it takes to be your own boss.

The pay-off: Working in a start-up is the ideal place to educate yourself on how to set goals, execute strategies, take your product to market and implement strong business operations.

Knowing if you have the right skills.

So you’re still weighing up if these organisations are right for you? I spoke to some of our top talent in Australia and they shared these traits needed to thrive:

Inquisition – Explore your options to find the exact best match for you. Fast growth organisations are not all the same and often have different models and very different products – take your time to find the perfect match as you’ll need to be passionate about the job you’re about to take on.

Judgment: Chances are you’re going to be figuring out a lot for yourself so you need to like making decisions that sometimes shooting in the dark. You show up for work and can sense what needs to be done without being told, and you do it.

Communication: Email, phone, face to face, pressure, sometimes chaos – You maintain calm poise and find a way forward. You aren’t alarmed by people throwing things in your direction – you can motivate yourself and teach others to join you.

Curiosity: You like to give things a go and test outcomes outside of your (and often your teams) comfort zone. You seek out the opportunity to learn. You avoid boredom and routine. You’re willing to keep trying and failing.

Courage: You’re going to stand up for what you believe is right – if you think the company is going in a direction that conflicts with it’s shared values, you’re going to voice your concerns and communicate your argument. On the other side of the coin – you’ll also be able to push forward when you don’t always agree with a day-to- day decision.

Passion: You’ll be signed up to publications and build networks of the industry you’re working in. You’ll be out and about at events when you can and reading the latest trends reports because you want to – not because you need to. It’s this passion that will help you identify problems in your own day to day operations and inspire to create industry leading solutions.

Do you work in a fast growth or start up company? I’d be keen to hear your experiences in the comments below.

Keep yourself in the know over the coming month as we’ll be following the hottest brands launching in Australia and sharing exclusive career insights with you. Sound like your cup of tea?

Yes please. 

The interview that gave me more than I bargained for…

Patrizia Iacono, Executive Assistant to the Group CIO Insurance Australia Group is quite honestly one of the most interesting people I’ve spoken to.

As with most interviews, I was speaking  to Patrizia due to her participation in an event of ours. In this case it was the EAPA Summit 2014.

I thought the interview was going to lead down a path specifically for some top tips that EAs and PAs could have to help them progress in their career. This group of professionals is a personal favorite of mine, and I always try to get some top resources to share with them.

However, i had completely underestimated how much i’d personally be able to take away from our conversation – Looking forward to meeting in July, but for now, over to Patrizia for the insights.

Hope you enjoy as much as i did…

I have been an Executive Assistant for over 20 years now, I started at the top, which is a really unusual place to start, I started supporting the chairman of a global advertising agency with my first job and I was very fortunate that I landed that role. It was a role that I really didn’t want because I was going to be an advertising executive, and I was working at the time on the Myer Children’s Wear account as an account executive. Believe it or not, it all fell apart one Friday afternoon when my boss called me in to his office to say that effective on the Monday morning I’d be working for our chairman, and it really was from day one where I fell in love with the role and really enjoyed the role very, very much.

It steamrolled from there with a move to Sydney, working for the CEO at the time, Dr Richard Walsh, and from there I went on to work at Lion Nathan, working for their chairman, back into adverting. From advertising I landed what you would call the job of a lifetime where I was working for an American IT management consultancy and my role was traveling the globe alongside our CEO with just a laptop and a mobile phone. For its time it was really a rare occurrence in this country for any executive assistant to land such a role, whereas in today’s climate it is becoming more common.

Things changed from there and I fell pregnant after 15 years that I’d been married, I took a step sideways and decided to work part time for a few years until my daughter was old enough to join school, and I picked up my career from there and here I am now. Really loving the role and loving being a great executive assistant, for me now it’s about sharing the knowledge I’ve acquired over those years and hopefully inspiring others through my mentoring. I have relationships with over 40 executive assistants as their mentor and it’s something I truly am passionate about.

Alex – We still have a lot of issues around people struggling with personality clashes; obviously you’ve worked for many different types of bosses and colleagues. What’s your advice on how to cope with those demanding personalities?

Patrizia –  I’ve had my fair share of demanding executives, even some that I now refer to as my Miranda, from the movie The Devil Wears Prada. The key to handling these demanding personalities is that I’ve always managed to adapt to the personality of the executive that I support. Some of those skills that I use are understanding their needs, their tasks and executing it as quickly as possible. You will know when an executive wants a task completed yesterday rather than today, it’s all about acting with speed and efficiency, and in turn that is what builds that trust which is crucial in the relationship of the EA and their executive.

The other skill I would add here is foresight, that ability to plan what could go wrong before it does go wrong, you have a demanding executive who has meetings back to back all day, what I would be doing is starting from the night before checking all the meetings for the following days, are the attendees confirmed, are the bookings in there, have technology been confirmed, PC facilities, etc. It’s ensuring the executive has their pre-reading material in hand as well.

If there’s travel involved, it’s having that foresight to say, right, reconfirm the car service ahead of time, ask them to pick up your boss ten minutes before because that person’s a picnicker or stresser, it’s all about you really having that foresight to go in there and nab all the things that could go wrong before they do go wrong.

I always think of it as when an executive becomes irate I never take it personally, I never have taken it personally, but I take it professionally, for me it’s, why is he irate and what can I do to actually calm this situation, to me the biggest tip is always stay cool, calm and collected.

Alex – A lot of people that come to our EA and PA summit are at the start of their career, but not sure about where they can go or where they want to go from here on in. What sort of plan you think people should be putting in place to make sure career development is constantly a vision and a clear goal for them?

Patrizia – For me, that stage really begins at the research stage before you join an organisation; what I’ve done in every role that I’ve ever been in and the organisations I’ve joined is that I’ve actually researched and evaluated the organisation before even going in for an interview with the executive or with the HR team of that organisation. For me it helps to ascertain if that organisation is investing in their employee’s career development plans, and some of the questions that I always would ask and do ask are, what training programmes are offered for EAs, does the organisation have an EA community, is there a mentor programme in place?

Once you’ve joined that organisation, that is the right fit for you, what I’ve done is sit down with the executive and work out a clear set of objectives and career plan. For example, my personal career plan is mapped out as a strategy document, what I’ve got is a plan of action to achieve a set of goals, I’ve identified what I want to accomplish, in six months, in a year, and three years, that’s how I keep on track with my personal career development and achievable goals, I really think that’s the forward plan that most EAs should be really thinking about when they do join an organisation.

Alex – Personal brand is something that comes up frequently. What tips would you give to develop personal brand and perception?

Patrizia – Personal brand is really, really important to me. Your personal brand is your professional reputation, it’s the impression we all leave or the image we want to portray that we will be remembered for. It’s a choice we make on how we’re going to leverage ourselves in the workplace, it’s also a great opportunity to showcase the knowledge which is important to the success and the career progression of any EA.

Some of the tips that I’d like to share are those that I’ve built up over the last 20 years, really think about how people see you through the way you communicate, are you empathetic and approachable; the way you play ball in the organisation; are you seen as a team player or a silo player; are you a problem solver with a real can-do attitude. Are you sharing the knowledge and inspiring others; and do you treat others the way you want to be treated? As an EA we are the brand of the executive we support and certainly the organisation, both internally and externally.

Alex – With the variety of tasks that need to be juggled, have you got any ideas in terms of organisational excellence, where do you think we can really start to improve that time management?

Patrizia – We face many challenges in the organisation, on a daily basis. To achieve that organisational excellence we need to remember that we’re no longer viewed as the support staff but more as that integral business partner. We’re finally matching the skills of the people that we support. We’re also serving as innovation catalyst, we manage and simplify those processes, time can be a huge benefit to the executive. We need to have the business acumen to understand the strategy and plan to deliver that vision through our own analytic thoroughness, innovation and cultural awareness through time management. By managing the executive’s day to day business, you’re giving them time back so they spend more time focusing on strategy and certainly productivity.

Time management for me never has been an issue, it’s learning to prioritise, pretty much by the time I get to work in the mornings I know exactly what’s going on, it’s how we manage that time effectively to give them time back.

If you run out of time and it’s just not working, always ask for help, always reach out to your peers, to anyone to say, can you give me hand, don’t ever be afraid to ask for help.

Alex – Has the job been how you expected it to be?

Patrizia – The role of the executive assistant means being much, much more than just that standard job description that you’re given at a job interview or that you may read on a recruitment website. For me it’s not just the hard skills, okay, sure, we do need those hard skills, but what’s really important especially now is the ability to actually bring a lot more soft skills to the role.

Business is now becoming a lot more agile than it ever has been, and especially with organisations having to respond rapidly to changes in internal and external environments without losing that vision, we’re actually required to start using a lot more of the soft skills; the multitasking, organisation, adaptability, flexibility and initiative. We really are creating and evolving our own unique job description day by day in the organisation we work in.

Alex – I was interested if you had any stories to tell, have you ever been tasked with something quite strange or something you weren’t expecting to do?

Patrizia – Definitely. I had a Miranda moment, that’s how I love to refer to them. Some years ago I was working for an executive who was invited to attend the Academy Awards in Los Angeles, I got him off to the airport, got him on the plane, when he landed in Los Angeles and got to his hotel room he’d realised he’d left his favourite cufflinks in Sydney, and he wasn’t going to go to the Academy Awards without these particular cufflinks, it’s crazy, I know.

So I got this panicked call at 5 am saying, well, I won’t say asking, he was actually telling me that he needed these cufflinks and that he wanted me to personally fly them over. I was out of bed, within a couple of hours, I’d booked a car to drive me to his apartment, find the cufflinks, drive to the airport, book a flight, fly to Los Angeles, cab it to the Beverly Wilshire, cab straight back to the airport and fly home to Sydney, if that’s not weird, I’m not sure what is. But he was a very, very happy executive and went off to the Academy Awards with his favourite cufflinks, that’s one of my, probably one of the strangest, I’d say, but one of many, many stories that I love to share.

It was, it was all done in a day, literally in a day, I think the flight landed that morning and I was back on a flight that evening, yes, it was crazy.