Facebook on a quest to revolutionize financial services marketing

With 12 million users in Australia, Facebook has developed into a core marketing platform to help organisations achieve their business objectives.

The organisation has been through a bit of a transformation of late, with the initial focus being the social networking customer experience – adding features to revolutionise the way we communicate and share with each other. Now though, the spotlight is well and truly on the business world, to leverage the wealth of information Facebook holds to drive efficiency and experience for financial services.

Here in Australia, Paul McCroy joined the Facebook team 12 months ago and his role as Head of Travel and Finance tasked him with the objective to build a team that can work closely with financial services to use Facebook. Paul explains: “It started with the team we created. We’ve hired a group of people to really understand the problems industry is faced with; we have people who worked in finance now working for us. It’s a constant focus to understand the problems faced by industry and build our Facebook platform to solve those problems. From there we want to work closely with financial services here in Australia to help them use Facebook in the best way possible.”

Whilst some of the big four were initially sceptical about the potential threat of Facebook in the financial services arena, the social networking giant has insisted they want to grow new users and enhance experience, rather than create banking services of its own.

Mobile

There’s a huge focus on mobile and it’s clear to see why. Digital advertising overtook traditional advertising for the first time last year, drive mainly by the onset of mobile. With 10 million active daily users and 85 per cent accessing via mobile devices – it’s easy to see where the potential lies for many a marketing team. Paul explains:

“Digital has overtaken television and mobile is the new upstart. Facebook became a mobile first business two years ago, transforming from desktop. Here in Australia, there’s a higher mobile percentage than any other developed country. Facebook represents an opportunity to take advantage of the fact that more people are consuming media on mobile phones.”

It’s this drive to mobile that’s seen a surge in app development over recent years, with the finance industry among the top performers for app engagement, providing customers with ease of access like never before. But with many banks allocating huge resources to develop their own assets, is there really any need to tap into the Facebook pool? Paul explained where the potential lies:

“One of the immediate benefits is the opportunity to capitalise on the trend. Mobile Banking was developed to service the customers where they are. It is also the most cost efficient way to service customers and has been quoted by Mckinsey as 1/8 the cost of servicing via the call centre.

“One in every five minutes on a mobile phone is spent on Facebook properties. When you want to speak to people who are on a phone, Facebook is where you should go. Our biggest growth area is banks taking their apps to our platform and promoting their advert in front of their customers. Customers then go and install that app unit. In terms of results, we’re the most cost effective for getting apps installed – 30 to 40 per cent of app installs come from Facebook.”

“Phase two is where the banks have people with the app installed, but they’re not necessarily engaged. We have developed a tool that helps with app engagement. Essentially, once it’s installed, you continuously re-engage them so that they use it as a utility. By them frequently engaging on the app, it takes the pressure off the contact centre and service channels, so the overall experience has been a success.”

Easing data concerns

There are some real alarm bells that often get triggered thanks to some serious spotlight on large data companies like Facebook and Google. Naturally an integrated banking service would lead to some data concerns, an area Paul insists is at the core of that they do:

“We don’t give anybody data. We have 12 million Australian users who do a lot of things on our platform. What we do is provide a targeting interface to enable advertisements to people that fit their interest behaviour. That data is never given back to an advertiser, it stays with us. Our primary goal is privacy. We’re one of the largest data companies the world has and will ever see. Everything we do is about keeping our site secure. It works well with banks, as it’s exactly the same as what they do. Whilst some people see data as a problem, we see it as a really nice fit.”

 Driving experience and efficiency

The team at Facebook are already seeing results creating unique experiences by targeting the right people, with the right content, on the right platform.

“When it’s done well, the conversions are huge. There are key challenges facing industry right now – efficiency, scalability and profitability.

We know certain media channels are becoming more expensive, every company in the world wants to achieve their goals in a more efficient manner. Where in the world is there more scale and engagement than Facebook? Our users are very engaged and it’s a huge opportunity to reach your customers and prospects at scale.”

Paul will be speaking at Digital Financial Services 2014: “I want to impart some of that knowledge to the audience and provide real life examples. A big thing we want to bring is what we see trending and how we can work with you to capitalise on some of those trends. We’ll also take a look at what we’re developing in the future.”

Visit www.digitalfinancialservices.com.au or follow @digifinance for more information on the event.

View the full interview with Paul here: http://youtu.be/t196-WP4_8U

Getting true value from outsourcing: the recipe for success

I first bumped into Jane Stafford, Executive Manager for Banking Process & Optimisation at Suncorp Banking during our Process Excellence event last year,  then again during Shared Services and Outsourcing Week. Jane certainly knows a thing or two about outsourcing – she’s been in the banking and finance industry for more than 20 years, spending years managing the optimal blend of insourcing and outsourcing strategies and implementation for business processes.

Jane’s current role is to manage Process Ownership for Suncorp Bank, monitoring, measuring and delivering business improvement strategies with a focus on process simplification, cost reduction and improved customer experience.  I recently caught up with Jane ahead of here workshop at SSOW 2014 to delve into the key ingredients for achieving an optimal blend – helping other organisations to maximise the true value of outsourcing.  Jane shared her insights on how the landscape has shifted, paving a new way for vendor relationships. Take a read below:

I’m absolutely seeing a need for outsourced providers to continue to be relevant by looking at providing services that sit outside of data entry. Automation is really kicking off in in our industry. We’re seeing far more centralisation of corporate functions (generally the higher value activities like analytics). That’s going have a flow-on effect into knowledge process outsourcing.

We’re seeing the impact of increased regulation occurring. That puts a squeeze on our margins and puts the spotlight on process innovation. The knock on effect to providers is they need to be able to innovate with end to end outsourcing and continue to drive down the cost that sits within that process through lean methodology or something similar.

A few years ago there was a lot of low hanging fruit for outsource providers, if they could do the data entry, they had business. However, client needs are changing as a consequence of a number of different factors that puts pressure on them to go up the value curve in terms of what they can offer from the service point of view.

There are a few fundamentals when looking to cement outsourcing and drive relationships that open up new levels of value:

Keep the ingredients fresh

The secret is building capability in-house to manage optimal blends. Optimal blends means that you are constantly looking at your landscape, making decisions around what is appropriate to outsource, automate and keep in-house.

It’s not as simple as locking in on those three things; it’s constantly evolving depending on what’s happening within your business, what’s happening within the environment and what’s happening in your innovation stakes. We have found most success in just having that management capability pool.

We’ve set up that infrastructure to manage an optimal blend for both onshore and offshore. My team are constantly monitoring dashboards to work out what’s on the horizon in terms of automation onshore or offshore. That involves rolling things back from time to time, and having a framework based on strategy rather than just reacting to what we had done previously.

Set the right temperature

Look at all the decisions that will need to happen to support the way you’ve decided to go. It starts by establishing your core competencies – all the decisions are based around that and people will be challenged if there’s no understanding of what they are.

Executive sponsorship is crucial. There needs to be an appetite to manage the people and cultural components, because every decision you make around in-house, automation or outsourcing has knock on effects that need to be managed throughout that change period. You won’t get your benefit if that isn’t addressed very early on.

One of the key things we learnt five or six years ago is that it’s okay to have a strategy that’s learnt during outsourcing, but if the business is not ready in its own maturity and its own journey, where you haven’t intervened enough to support a new culture, that culture will eat your strategy anyway.

Clean up as you go

Be clear on what your drivers are if you’re choosing to outsource. For us, it was about cost efficiency, labour arbitrage and accessing scale from the outset. But the more and more I get into it, the less important those factors are to me personally, the more I’m actually looking to have providers perform innovation, lean  and refine our processes to remove waste from them. If you don’t have that, your processes end up being old and full of waste.

There’s never a truer analogy of garbage in, garbage out, than when you’re doing an outsource transition…

Set the timer, watch it rise

There are some key areas where you can unlock huge value in the vendor–client relationship: 

  • Move away from master-servant relationships: We’ve tried to co-locate and second people from the outsourced organisation into our organisation, coming to an arrangement with our provider where we actually have contracted in someone from India to be in my team for 12 months. They are actively working in Australia, onshore, understanding the business end-to-end. It takes trust to open your books completely, but the sharing of information and depth of understanding about what we can achieve for our customers is far deeper.
  • At an operational level: Position your outsource provider as an extension of your current team, just sat in another location. Include them in your reward and recognition programme – our outsourcers tend to really enjoy that. It’s still a work in progress for us, but I think it’s the next big thing, to challenge both organisations to position themselves around the commercial structure. That’s where you’re really putting everything on the line.
  • Think beyond the service levels: Our commercials are still structured around SLAs, turnaround times and individual processes. That inhibits everybody from being free of worrying about whether or not a penalty is going to apply. The future is about contracting to end outcomes and saying, “You know what? We don’t care if it’s 24 hours or if it’s 48 hours, this is the outcome we are looking for”. The onus is on both sides, it takes trust and the other party to be willing to not take advantage of that trust too.