Change is coming to HR… Are you ready?

Business transformation was previously driven by a focus on cost savings. It’s maturing at a rapid pace to focus on the customer, standardising functions where possible to drive efficiency and new service standards.

Any function involving transformation brings the people to the forefront – as a result, HR has become a strong voice in the boardroom.

Last week saw the return of APAC’s largest business transformation event. SSON’s Shared Services and Outsourcing Week really shone the spotlight on HR transformation throughout 2014 and into 2015.

Although we’ve seen a rapid change in the HR function of many organisations over recent years, there’s still plenty on the horizon. A few key areas stood out that I wanted to share with you. There’s also a practical look at some of the tips shared for the most common theme of the event… change management.

Process Standardisation

It’s going to be a tough balancing act between standardisation and specialisation – finding that balance is going to be critical to success.

Without standardisation it’s going to be nearly impossible to use KPIs to chart improvements as the HR function continues to become more strategic. It’s time to start thinking about:

  • How do you balance standardisation vs. specialisation?
  • What is the role of global process owners in standardisation?

Recruitment process

As it gets tougher and tougher to find the right skills to fit the right culture, organisations are starting to think outside the box when it comes to recruitment. With software engineering, energy and life sciences, mathematics, IT, and other technical skills in short supply, companies need to expand their sourcing and recruiting to a global level. That could mean locating work sites where the best talent can be found and building talent networks that attract people worldwide.

A couple of key questions are hot on the lips of many HR execs…

  • Should recruitment be kept in-house?
  • How do you select an RPO partner?

Culture

Long gone are the days when culture was just a nice add-on for organisations. Culture fit is going to have a big impact on recruitment; it’s no longer just about matching skills and salary expectations. This will no doubt be the make or break of many relationships for the organisations choosing to go down the outsourcing path for recruitment.

Enabling flexibility

There have been many studies demonstrating the focus on BYOD and flexible working. This is going to have a huge impact on HR, employees are going to get to choose how they want to work, and the business has to be agile enough to make it work.

Retention

Instead of making HR jobs obsolete, technologies will transform them, allowing HR professionals greater ability and more time to do their jobs and develop their skills improving recruitment and retention.

The key question: How can data be used to drive recruitment and retention practices?

A few of the case studies discussed how 99 per cent of the time on data has been spent looking for it, with 1 per cent left to analyse it and no time to action it. Data has some real potential to improve retention, offering insights to employees – something never before possible.. This won’t just be the fancy software; almost all speakers who have been through HR transformation spoke highly of employee surveys and implementing Employee Value Propositions (EVP).

Keeping momentum

The Hackett Group came armed with some statistics looking at where the focus was for continuous improvement over the next 12 months – talent management was a clear stand out.

Change management doesn’t end at installation; change leaders will have to embed the change principles into the day to day development of employees.

Change Management – The insiders tips.

Without doubt change management is still one of the biggest challenges any organisation faces. It’s clear to see why: process improvement, customer service, technology – it means nothing without happy staff driving it.

Here’s a summary of some key takeaways to consider in your organisation:

  • Drive it from the start. It’s a long term goal with the aim to be customer focused; all employees should respect and value each other and keep that front of mind.
  • Be firm. Don’t be afraid to send a message that if you’re not going to come on the journey for improvement, consider if it’s time to move on.
  • Culture sits next to strategy and operational excellence – build the values from the ground up and spend the time with the staff. All your service efforts are banking on it.
  • Don’t merely lift and shift when it comes to shared services or outsourcing – just because you’ve moved it, doesn’t mean the job is done. Take a look at exactly what the implication is for the business and the staff that work there. Change management and culture might be in the shared service centre, but what’s happening with the people left? The new challenge is to learn how to engage the shared service centre.
  • Be clear on the lines of reporting – your staff will get frustrated if they can’t get responses or outcomes.
  • Standardise where possible – simplify, standardise and leverage. Align the template to your own issues, take the methodology and link it to your own culture or environment. It’s about winning people’s hearts and minds and engaging them in what you’re doing. Using a template doesn’t always account for that – it’s just a starting point.
  • Look at what to use, when to use and how to use – there’s science to change management, and the art comes with how you use it.
  • Use analytics and insights – change can be hard to measure, but it’s not impossible. Use engagement surveys and indicators of satisfaction around sick leave, training, meeting participation and engagement rates. All can provide you with a benchmark to measure success – if that engagement goes up, you’re onto a winner.
  • Be flexible and adapt to your drivers – what drives your employees now might not drive them tomorrow.
  • Finally… Communicate, communicate, then communicate some more.

Do NSW have the contact centre of the future?

Over 1,231,000 online visits since launch.

More than 356,000 calls to contact centres.

731,000 customers served.

All in less than a year since launch…

Service NSW is definitely taking off. The question is; how do you cope with this exponential increase in demand whilst keeping customers ‘delighted’? Well, with a 99 per cent contact centre customer satisfaction rate – we might just have the answer.

The organisation is pretty unique, launching in July 2013 and integrating three service delivery channels – a dedicated web portal, customer contact call centres, and shop-front services. This integration delivers the benefits of internet, cloud, mobile communications and customer relationship management platforms.

I recently caught up with Jody Grima, Director, Contact Centres, Service NSW to get the insight. She explains:

“We’re growing, and our numbers are rapidly increasing. After almost 12 months’ implementation, we’re still delighting customers, which is something that’s always a risk when you’ve got a new service. Does our culture pertain? Well it is, and that’s something that’s really exciting for us.”

Employee engagement

“Our vision is to be a leader in the delivery of customer service not only within government, but also within industry. A leader in customer experience and a leader in the provision of service. That ties in with our employee engagement ambitions, to be ranked in the top quartile.

“At Service New South Wales, the two go hand in hand. In order to deliver outstanding customer experience, you also need to actively engage and have a very happy workforce. That’s a key element to our vision and culture. Invest in your people and you get the outcome of a great customer experience.

“Being a new organisation, we recruited staff afresh. Nearly 60 per cent came from other government agencies, with 40 per cent coming from outside government. We’ve got a real mix of new staff to service New South Wales.

The focus in our training is on emotional intelligence – really looking at the soft skills and complementing that with the technical training.”

Continuing to meet the needs of the customer

“Customer feedback is extremely important to us, so we’re tracking that via CSAT (customer satisfaction scores), which is by a question asked within the contact centre at the end of each call.

“Since the launch, we have continued to modify and enhance the way our service is being designed. This feedback draws on market research, and what end users expect of the service.”

Call centre staff are using Salesforce information management tools. The cloud-based CRM capability helps track and manage customer profiles and tackle the most common enquiries. It enables staff to draw on a previous history, utilise a consolidated database, anticipate questions, increase first call resolutions and respond more promptly.

“We are continuing to build our knowledge base about questions that are routinely asked, and being able to answer these at the outset.

“We have what we call self-service customer feedback zones in the service centres. There’s immediate feedback going through in our physical shop fronts. We also have a feedback mechanism on our web page as well – a significant part of whether we’re achieving our goals or not.

“The other way we’re doing that is tracking against service levels and outcomes. Service New South Wales has a mandate, the Service New South Wales DNA. We’re continually reviewing our performance against those success factors and progressing exceptionally well. As we succeed, we can then continue to grow the service.”

“At the time of writing this, the contact centre had an average answer time of just 29 seconds. The challenge now is to pre-empt the demand. Since going live, customers have embraced the service much faster than expected.”

Up to 8,000 telephone numbers are being used to access information. The NSW government seeks to cut back on these enquiry landlines whilst saving on the cost of running many telephone systems.

During the Government Contact Centre Summit 2014, Customer Service Commissioner Michael Pratt will talk through the Service New South Wales journey – from creation, success, lessons and the culture change and vision for the coming years.